How to Handle Bad Tenants Ashtabula OH

Before you allow a tenant to move into your property, you can lay the groundwork for addressing future problems by using an airtight lease agreement. Every state has different landlord-tenant laws governing what your lease agreement can contain, so be sure to use a state-specific lease agreement.

Stuart Warren Cordell
(440) 997-6175
134 West 46th Street, P.O. Box 2300
Ashtabula, OH
Specialties
Business, Estate Planning, Real Estate, Tax
Education
Case Western Reserve University School of Law,Cornell University
State Licensing
Ohio

Bret Jamie Cimorell
(440) 992-6067
P.O. Box 2259
Ashtabula, OH
Specialties
Business, Real Estate, Probate
Education
Case Western Reserve University,Kent State University
State Licensing
Ohio

Duane J. Dubsky
(440) 998-6835
4817 State Road, Suite 100, P.O. Box 10
Ashtabula, OH
 
Joseph Law Svc Co Lpa
(440) 599-1445
293 Main St
Conneaut, OH

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William Clay Hofstetter
155 MAIN ST
CHARDON, OH
Specialties
Litigation, Real Estate, Estate Planning, Wills, Trusts
Education
Cleveland State University - Cleveland-Marshall College of Law,Cleveland State University
State Licensing
Ohio

Mark Warren Andrews
(440) 998-6835
4817 STATE RD STE 100
ASHTABULA, OH
Specialties
Administrative Law, Business, Commercial, Real Estate, Construction
Education
Cleveland State University - Cleveland-Marshall College of Law,Ohio State University, Columbus
State Licensing
Ohio

Jeffrey A. Ford
(440) 998-6835
4817 State Road, Suite 100, P.O. Box 10
Ashtabula, OH
 
Mark W. Andrews
(440) 998-6835
4817 State Road, Suite 100, P.O. Box 10
Ashtabula, OH
 
Keith Henry Raker
(216) 696-2468
925 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH
Specialties
Real Estate, Franchising, Financial Markets And Services
Education
Ohio State University Moritz College of Law,Ohio State University, Columbus,University of Richmond
State Licensing
Ohio

Richard Allen Myser
(740) 635-1601
320 Howard Street
Bridgeport, OH
Specialties
Real Estate, Trusts, Probate
Education
Ohio Northern University
State Licensing
Ohio

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How to Handle Bad Tenants

Bad tenants are a landlord's worst nightmare. Between not paying their rent, trashing your rental property, allowing pest infestations, committing criminal acts in the property and a hundred other miserable acts, bad tenants can make a landlord's life miserable. Fortunately, there are tactics you can employ to minimize the damage caused by bad tenants.

messy tenantsFirst Line of Defense: An Airtight Lease Agreement

Before you allow a tenant to move into your property, you can lay the groundwork for addressing future problems by using an airtight lease agreement. Every state has different landlord-tenant laws governing what your lease agreement can contain, so be sure to use a state-specific lease agreement. These can be sometimes be obtained through your state's website, but more likely you'll have to buy one online (EZ Landlord Forms offers a custom lease agreement for each state).

Among other provisions, a strong lease agreement states clearly the landlord's policies on cleanliness, property maintenance, criminal activity, late rental payment penalties and all other common problems that can arise.

Second Line of Defense: Adhere to All Disclosure Laws

Bad tenants will often run crying to sleazebag attorneys or Legal Aid, claiming that the "Big Bad Landlord wants to evict me! I didn't do anything wrong, oh protect me protect me!" And the first thing lawyers will do will check to make sure that your lease agreement is valid and that you complied with all applicable landlord-tenant laws, including delivering all of the necessary disclosures. You have several options for complying with these laws:

  1. You read your state's landlord-tenant code directly
  2. You hire a real estate attorney to tell you what to do, or
  3. You use an online landlord forms system that automatically fills in all of the required forms for your state. 

Third Line of Defense: Offer a Deal to the Tenant to Vacate

It always pays to offer a carrot before a stick, so when your tenants go bad, sit down with them, preferably in person and make them an offer. If they can be out of the property within the week, with all of their belongings, you won't take them to court and get a judgment against them. If they want to fight and drag it out, then tell them that you're going to file the eviction, which shows up on their credit report, and obtain a hefty judgment against them for back rent, court costs, legal fees and damages to the property.

Fourth Line of Defense: Comply wi...

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