Retirement Investments Fargo ND

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Retirement Investments. You will find informative articles about Retirement Investments, including "Investing Retirement Funds in a Business or Franchise". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Fargo, ND that can help answer your questions about Retirement Investments.

Mr. Paul A. Light, CFP®
(701) 356-5106
1220 Main Ave
Fargo, ND
Firm
Light Financial Services
Areas of Specialization
General Financial Planning

Data Provided by:
Ms. Shannon M. Gephart, CFP®
(701) 280-5124
3137 32nd Ave South
Fargo, ND
Firm
Alerus Financial

Data Provided by:
Mr. Paul J. Jarvis, CFP®
(701) 451-3059
3100 13th Avenue South
Fargo, ND
Firm
Bell State Bank & Trust
Areas of Specialization
Banking, Budget Development, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Estate Planning, General Financial Planning, Insurance Planning

Data Provided by:
Mr. Donald S. Meidinger, CFP®
(701) 476-8306
4310 17th Ave S
Fargo, ND
Firm
Eide Bailly LLP

Data Provided by:
Mr. Jay Charles Matthews, CFP®
(701) 241-9205
818 Main Ave
Fargo, ND
Firm
Producers Financial Group

Data Provided by:
Mr. Edward Oliver Samuelson Jr., CFP®
(701) 234-9009
PO Box 9196
Fargo, ND
Firm
Samuelson Planning

Data Provided by:
Mr. Kevin J. Dekrey, CFP®
(701) 492-2413
2000 44th St S Ste 402
Fargo, ND
Firm
MORGAN STANLEY SMITH BARNEY
Areas of Specialization
Comprehensive Financial Planning, Insurance Planning, Investment Management, Long-Term Care, Retirement Income Management, Wealth Management

Data Provided by:
Mr. Dennis A. Draeger, CFP®
(701) 232-8886
2731 12th Ave S
Fargo, ND
Firm
Ameriprise Financial Services,
Areas of Specialization
Asset Allocation, Comprehensive Financial Planning, Education Planning, Estate Planning, General Financial Planning, Insurance Planning, Investment Management
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $500,001 - $1,000,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000



Data Provided by:
Ms. Ronda M Zupi, CFP®
(701) 235-9858
1900 44th Street South
Fargo, ND
Firm
AgCountry Farm Credit Services

Data Provided by:
Mr. Doyle A. Ranstrom, CFP®
(701) 293-5789
808 3rd Ave S
Fargo, ND
Firm
Ranstrom Financial Planning
Areas of Specialization
General Financial Planning
Key Considerations
Average Net Worth: $250,001 - $500,000

Average Income: $100,001 - $250,000

Profession: Not Applicable

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Investing Retirement Funds in a Business or Franchise

retirement funds small business
Growing numbers of small business and franchise entrepreneurs are discovering that their retirement assets can be diversified into investments outside of the stock market. They’re finding that, through a vehicle commonly referred to as Rollover as Business Start-ups (ROBS), they are allowed to legally invest 401(k) money in their own small business without taking a taxable distribution or getting a loan. It’s estimated that in 2010, more than 4,000 individuals will become entrepreneurs by investing their existing retirement assets into a business – and in turn – will create more than 25,000 jobs.

Entrepreneurs who work with expert companies to correctly complete a private investment in their own company often cite this “investment in oneself” as especially attractive since they wholeheartedly believe in their ability to open, operate and successfully lead a business. Another reason this type of transaction is attractive to an entrepreneur is because they can invest in their business without getting a loan. This means that the new business can reinvest the initial cash flow into the business instead of sending it off to a bank in the form of interest payments. It is reasonable to assume that a business that is not servicing high interest loans has a shorter “runway” to reach profitability. Guidant Financial reports that its clients are 63% more likely to succeed than other traditional business owners.

ROBS transactions generally involve four or five steps which, although complex, can potentially be completed in less than three weeks. The process generally includes the following steps:

  1. A new business entity, a C corporation is formed on the client’s behalf
  2. The client then rolls up to 100% of their eligible retirement funds into a newly created 401(k) plan;
  3. This plan, in turn, invests in the stock of the new corporation;
  4. The corporation, now flush with funds and free of debt acquires a small business or franchise.

There are many reasons that an entrepreneur would choose to invest in their own business. Reasons may include, but are not limited to:

  • They believe a small business they own and control is the best investment for their retirement plan.
  • They receive a debt-free equity injection into the enterprise;
  • They can provide their employees (including them) with a 401(k) plan, a benefit rarely seen in American small business today

The legal requirements for establishing and operating 401(k) plans were created under the Employee and Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), which identifies the guidelines for 401(k) plan investments. These 401(k) plans, also called pension plans, are carefully protected by the IRS and DOL, so all transactions involving them need to ultimately benefit of the plan.

ROBS transactions are increasing in popularity, especially in a financial climate unfriendly to borrowers. Yet they’re still misunderstood by far too many...

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