Socially Responsible Investing: Investing in a Better World Seattle WA

For a variety of reasons, whether environmental, religious or political, investors are in fact concerned with how their money is generating its return. From this social awareness has emerged the money management strategy known as socially responsible investing, or SRI.

David Lamp
BBJS Financial Advisors, LLC
(206) 682-4840
1501 Fourth Avenue, Suite 2880
Seattle, WA
Expertises
High Net Worth Client Needs, Alternative or Private Investments, Hourly Financial Planning Services, Planning Concerns for Corporate Executives, Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®

Eric Turloff
Turloff Financial Consulting, Inc.
(206) 842-1422
701 5th Ave
Seattle, WA
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Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Plan Investment Advice, Tax Planning, Advising Entrepreneurs, Planning Issues for Business Owners, Cash Flow/Budgets/Credit Issues
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, BBA, CFA, CPA

Ben Jennings
SoundView Advisors
(360) 867-9890
1700 Seventh Avenue, Suite 2100
Seattle, WA
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Ongoing Investment Management, Advising Medical Professionals, Women's Financial Planning Issues, Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules, Insurance Related Issues, including Annuities, Estate & Generational Planning Issues
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, CLU, CPA/PFS

Joseph Hebert
trueNorth Financial Services, LLC
(206) 652-4314
1411 Fourth Avenue, Suite 1500
Seattle, WA
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Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules, Helping Clients Identify & Achieve Goals
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®

Karen O'Brien
trueNorth Financial Services, LLC
(206) 652-4314
1411 Fourth Avenue, Suite 1500
Seattle, WA
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Helping Clients Identify & Achieve Goals, College/Education Planning, Tax Planning, Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, CPA

Therese Govern
trueNorth Financial Services, LLC
(206) 652-4314
1411 Fourth Avenue, Suite 1500
Seattle, WA
Expertises
Ongoing Investment Management, Helping Clients Identify & Achieve Goals, Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules, Women's Financial Planning Issues
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, CPA, MBA

Ethan Broga
Empirical Wealth Management
(206) 923-3474
1420 Fifth Avenue, Suite 3150
Seattle, WA
Expertises
Ongoing Investment Management, Retirement Planning & Distribution Rules, Tax Planning, Retirement Plan Investment Advice, High Net Worth Client Needs, Hourly Financial Planning Services
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, MS

Frederic Kutscher
Kutscher Rhodes & Benner, Inc.
(206) 382-4414
705 Second Avenue, Suite 800, Hoge Building
Seattle, WA
Expertises
Estate & Generational Planning Issues, Ongoing Investment Management, Tax Planning, Charitable Giving - Trusts & Foundations, Advising Entrepreneurs, College/Education Planning
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, BA, CFP®, JD, MS

Elaine Scoggins
Merriman, Inc
(206) 285-8877
800 5th Avenue, Suite 2900
Seattle, WA
Expertises
Ongoing Investment Management, Helping Clients Identify & Achieve Goals, Women's Financial Planning Issues
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, ChFc

Michelle Fait
Satori Financial LLC
(206) 320-9263
1001 Fourth Avenue, Suite 3200
Seattle, WA
Expertises
Tax Planning, Helping Clients Identify & Achieve Goals, Women's Financial Planning Issues
Certifications
NAPFA Registered Financial Advisor, CFP®, EA, MBA

Socially Responsible Investing: Investing in a Better World

Traditionally, a portfolio’s performance has been judged by two variables: risk and return. Through this scope, it is an investment manager’s responsibility to construct a portfolio that generates the highest return while maintaining a tolerable risk level. One faulty assumption imbedded in this two-variable philosophy is that the investor has no interest in the social costs incurred through the creation of this portfolio. For a variety of reasons, whether environmental, religious or political, investors arein fact concerned with how their money is generating its return. From this social awareness has emerged the money management strategy known as socially responsible investing, or SRI.

SRI assets rose more than 258 [percent] from $639 billion in 1995 to $2.29 trillion in 2005, while the broader universe of assets under professional management increased less than 249 [percent] from $7 trillion to $24.4 trillion over the same period,�? according to a recent survey of the industry by the Social Investment Forum. Today, nearly one out of every 10 dollars under professional management is held by an SRI fund.

SRI managers use three fundamental approaches to invest in a more sustainable and humane society:


Screening is the practice of filtering possible investments through evaluation of a company’s compatibility with criteria used by a specific fund. Some funds focus on environmental issues and others on labor conditions, while many use a wider scope and require a general history of corporate social responsibility. It is still the job of the manager to achieve desired returns while managing risk, but some promising investments will surely be omitted if they can’t meet the relevant standards.

Shareholder Advocacy takes a proactive line of attack to responsible investing. In contradiction to screening strategies, those practicing shareholder activism often invest in unethical companies, hoping to bring about positive change through shareholder resolutions. This process can raise awareness on specific issues and create dialogue with management that otherwise would be nonexistent.

Community Investing is an effort to direct capital into neighborhoods often overlooked by traditional financial services. This approach focuses on issues such as affordable housing, small business creation and development of community facilities. For individual investors, holding cash with financial institutions dedicated to community development--such as credit unions, local savings and loans and development loan funds--can provide competitive returns while helping support economic growth in areas shunned by capitalism. For institutional investors, participation could come in the form of venture capital funding or ownership of real estate, such as low income housing. More information on community investing options can be found at www.communityinvest.org .

What about performance? Do those involved in socially responsible invest...

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