1031 Exchanges in a Foreclosure Situation Seattle WA

Some investors are faced with the prospect of a short sale, or a lender’s foreclosure. The investors in this situation have a multitude of concerns ranging from the loss of the equity invested in their property to a reduced credit rating. Unfortunately, there is often another consequence: the short sale or lender’s foreclosure can sometimes result in an income tax gain that must be recognized.

Wendy L Walter
(425) 586-1946
1301 2ND AVE
SEATTLE, WA
Specialties
Tax, Banking, Chapter 11, Chapter 13, Chapter 7, Foreclosure, Litigation, Debt Agreements
Education
Seattle University School of Law,University of Alaska - Fairbanks,University of New Hampshire
State Licensing
Washington

Antoinette M Davis
(206) 624-9894
720 Olive Way Ste 1000
Seattle, WA
Specialties
Bankruptcy, Debt Collection, Fraud, Foreclosure, Litigation
State Licensing
Washington

Jean M Defond
(206) 239-6351
818 Stewart St Ste 610
Seattle, WA
Specialties
Debt Collection, Banking, Foreclosure, Land Use & Zoning
State Licensing
Oregon, Washington

Katrina Eve Glogowski
(206) 903-9966
600 1st Ave Ste 501
Seattle, WA
Specialties
Foreclosure, Landlord & Tenant, Debt Collection
Education
University of Dayton,University of Rochester
State Licensing
Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, Washington

David A. Weibel
(206) 622-5306
720 OLIVE WAY STE 1301
SEATTLE, WA
Specialties
Business, Real Estate, Foreclosure, Landlord & Tenant, Banking
Education
Seattle University School of Law,Seattle Pacific University
State Licensing
Oregon, Washington

Michael Sean Walsh
(206) 622-5306
720 OLIVE WAY STE 1301
SEATTLE, WA
Specialties
Foreclosure, Landlord & Tenant
Education
Northeastern University School of Law,Western Washington University
State Licensing
Washington

Jennifer Lynn Aspaas
(206) 622-5306
720 OLIVE WAY STE 1301
SEATTLE, WA
Specialties
Chapter 7, Real Estate, Litigation, Foreclosure
Education
Golden Gate University School of Law,University of Washington -Seattle,University of Washington -Sea
State Licensing
Washington

Sarah Weaver
(206) 388-0138
1325 4th Ave Ste 940
Seattle, WA
Specialties
Bankruptcy, Debt Collection, Foreclosure
State Licensing
Oregon, Washington

Joseph P. Mccarthy
(206) 386-7534
600 University Street, Suite 3600
Seattle, WA
Specialties
Real Estate, Foreclosure
Education
George Washington University National Law Center,Bucknell University
State Licensing
Oregon, Washington

William Lawrence Bishop JR
(206) 622-5306
720 OLIVE WAY STE 1301
SEATTLE, WA
Specialties
Real Estate, Commercial, Insurance, Business, Residential, Foreclosure
Education
University of Washington -Seattle
State Licensing
Washington

How to Analyze 1031 Exchanges in a Foreclosure Situation

Some investors are faced with the prospect of a short sale, or a lender’s foreclosure. The investors in this situation have a multitude of concerns ranging from the loss of the equity invested in their property to a reduced credit rating. Unfortunately, there is often another consequence: the short sale or lender’s foreclosure can sometimes result in an income tax gain that must be recognized. This is especially true where the investment property was originally acquired in a §1031 tax deferred exchange.

 
A gain for tax purposes would occur in the context of a short sale or foreclosure, if the mortgage debt encumbering the property is greater than the taxpayer’s adjusted basis for income tax purposes. This happens because the transfer of the property to the lender is treated in part as if the investment property is sold to the lender for its fair market value. The determination of how much gain is recognized, and the character of the gain in this context, depends on whether the mortgage debt is recourse (e.g., a loan for which the borrower is personally liable) or nonrecourse (e.g., a loan for which the borrower is not personally liable). If the mortgage secures a recourse loan, the investor is treated for income tax purposes as: (i) having cancellation of indebtedness income to the extent that the mortgage debt exceeds the fair market value of the property and (ii) a capital gain or loss equal to the difference between the actual value of the property and the taxpayer’s adjusted basis for income tax purposes. In the case of a nonrecourse loan, the investor recognizes a capital gain equal to the difference between the mortgage debt and the investor’s basis in the property. In a nonrecourse analysis, the fair market value of the property is treated as not less than the nonrecourse debt.
 
As previously mentioned, the tax consequences of a short sale or foreclosure are often considered only after the property is gone and the dust has settled. As it turns out, a savvy investor may be able to defer the gain resulting from the short sale or foreclosure. For example, the cash that would otherwise be needed to pay the tax liability could be used to acquire replacement property in a §1031 tax deferred exchange. For practical reasons, this option will not be available to all of the investors, but in some cases it works beautifully. The following is an example of how some taxpayers are using this strategy in a fractional ownership foreclosure:
 
The investor completes a tax deferred exchange in which a tenant-in-common interest in commercial real property (TIC interest) is acquired. The TIC interest is managed under a master lease under which the investor receives a percentage of the net rent received by the master lessee on the property. The investor’s “exchange basis�? in the TIC interest is $70. The TIC interest is originally acquired with a value of $200 and secures an...

Click here to read the rest of this article from NuWire Investor